AJR Sweeps National Press Club Press Criticism Awards  | American Journalism Review
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From AJR,   June/July 2006

AJR Sweeps National Press Club Press Criticism Awards   

Managing Editor Rachel Smolkin wins in the body of work category, and senior writer Sherry Ricchiardi receives honorable mention. Senior writer Susan Paterno wins in the single-entry category for her exploration of the Gary Webb saga.


For immediate release, June 14, 2006

American Journalism Review, the bi-monthly magazine published by the Philip Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland, has swept the print criticism category of the National Press Club Awards, the organization announced June 12.

All of the Arthur Rowse Awards in Press Criticism for print went to AJR writers. This prestigious award, named after the retired U.S. News & World Report media critic, honors the year's best examination of the media industry.

"We're thrilled by this recognition for AJR and its outstanding staff and contributors," said Dean Thomas Kunkel. "It is another indication that the industry needs and values the kind of depth reporting that is AJR's specialty."

AJR Managing Editor Rachel Smolkin won in the body of work category, the second time in three years she has done so. AJR senior writer Sherry Ricchiardi received honorable mention in the category.

Senior writer Susan Paterno won for best single article for her exploration of the Gary Webb saga. She broke the streak of fellow AJR senior writer Charles Layton, who had won this award the three previous years.

"We're really pleased that the fine work of these wonderful journalists has been recognized by the National Press Club," said AJR Editor and Senior Vice President Rem Rieder. "In a world overrun with journalism punditry, we're particularly happy to see our peers honor this heavily reported work."

The awards will be presented at a National Press Club dinner on July 17.

American Journalism Review is a national magazine that covers all aspects of print, television, radio and online media. The magazine, which is published six times a year, examines how the media cover specific stories and broader coverage trends. AJR is one of two national press reviews still in print, joining Columbia Journalism Review based at Columbia University.

The National Press Club, the Washington-based group with 3,657 members who work in journalism and communication, selected the winners from 280 entries in 24 categories.

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