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January/February 2002
Identity Crisis
The Philadelphia Inquirer has been buffeted by a major staff reduction, sagging circulation, the loss of a popular editor and a blurred sense of mission. It also has a proud tradition and, despite painful losses, a talented staff capable of great journalism. What lies ahead?   > read more
By  Lori Robertson
A Killing Field for Journalists
The war in Afghanistan—a land of gun-toting gangs and no central government or police force—is one of the most dangerous reporting assignments in modern times.   > read more
By  Sherry Ricchiardi
Left in the Lurch
The liberal-left press finds itself under siege and bitterly divided in the wake of the September 11 terrorist attacks.   > read more
By  Nina J. Easton
Serious Business
The terrorist attacks have impelled many journalism students to look at their future profession in a new way.   > read more
By  Don Campbell
Rediscovering the World
September 11 showed all too clearly what a terrible mistake it was for America’s news media to largely ignore foreign news.   > read more
By  Thomas Ginsberg
The View From Abroad
The foreign media are covering the war on terror through lenses that differ dramatically from those used by their American counterparts.   > read more
By  George A. Krimsky
The Purity of Their Passion
Teaching high-school students reminds this journalist why this profession is so important.   > read more
By  Mark McCormick
Casualties of War
Afghanistan has proven to be exceedingly dangerous for journalists.   > read more
By  Thomas Kunkel
The Ripples of September 11
And what they mean for journalism   > read more
By  Rem Rieder
Not for Everyone
Online forums are not the best aspect of the Web.   > read more
By  Barb Palser
What New Reality?
Copter-loving TV news is still wedded to “hover journalism.”   > read more
By  Deborah Potter
Hiding Behind National Security
The Bush administration’s secrecy measures go too far.   > read more
By  Jane Kirtley
Why Circulation Keeps Dropping
Blame it on “birth cohort replacement.”   > read more
By  John Morton
Sharing More Than a Corner of the Office
Post writer gives a kidney to her longtime co-worker in need of a transplant.   > read more
By  Kathryn S. Wenner
They're Grounded
The phrase "on the ground" is a favorite with reporters covering the war in Afghanistan.   > read more
By  Jill Rosen
Foreign Intrigue in Cedar Falls, Iowa
Talk show on foreign topics finds a home on Iowa campus.   > read more
By  Doug Brown
Small-Town Duel
Women launch second weekly, bringing competition to North Mancester, Indiana.   > read more
By  Stephen Chapman
No Alternative To Ad Woes
Alternative newspapers are no longer immune from economic pressures.   > read more
By  Burl Gilyard
And Now, For the Big Story
It wasn't all seriousness and hard news during the November sweeps.   > read more
By  Jill Rosen
A Useful Primer on Covering the Military
Pen & Sword: A Journalist’s Guide to Covering the Military By Ed Offley Marion Street Press 312 pages; $24.95   > read more
Book review by  Carl Sessions Stepp
Flying the Coop
At 84, photographer Marty Lederhandler decides it's time to retire from the Associated Press.   > read more
By  Shannon Canton
Blue Christmas
Three women on the sports staff at USA Today get fired for writing in dust on a specially commissioned sculpture at Gannett Co.'s expensive new digs.   > read more
By  Kathryn S. Wenner
Long Run
New York Times columnist Anthony Lewis retires from the paper where he spent half a century.   > read more
By  Kathryn S. Wenner
Full Speed Ahead
Vicki S. Gowler becomes editor of the St. Paul Pioneer Press after four years as managing editor, following Walker Lundy's departure for the Philadelphia Inquirer.   > read more
By  Kathryn S. Wenner
Early Retirement
Mindi Keirnan, general manager of the San Jose Mercury News, fulfills a lifelong dream by retiring at 45 to travel and live abroad.   > read more
By  Kathryn S. Wenner
Time to Relax
Scott McGehee, publisher of Fort Wayne, Indiana's News-Sentinel and CEO of Fort Wayne Newspapers, retires after 35 years in newspapering.   > read more
By  Kathryn S. Wenner
Cliché Corner   > read more
By  Jill Rosen
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