Year :
Issue :

October/November 2005
Silent No More
A distinguished band of Knight Ridder alumni takes a stand.   > read more
By  Rem Rieder
Taking Their Questions
The Post’s executive editor goes online to discuss the Bob Woodward uproar.   > read more
By  Rem Rieder
Say It Isn’t So, Bob
Woodward keeps a secret—from his bosses   > read more
By  Rem Rieder
Changing of the Guard
AJR welcomes a new managing editor and bids a fond hasta luego to an all-time favorite.   > read more
By  Rem Rieder
Press Release: Smolkin Succeeds Robertson as AJR Managing Editor   > read more
Life After Judy
The New York Times needs to confront tough questions about itself.   > read more
By  Rem Rieder
Don’t Blame Me
Ousted CBS producer Mary Mapes, who gave the world the ill-fated report on President Bush’s National Guard service, goes on the attack.   > read more
By  Rem Rieder
Sell or Else!
A big investor’s threat to Knight Ridder is bad news for the newspaper industry.   > read more
By  Rem Rieder
Doing the Right Thing
Keller’s mea culpa in the Judith Miller saga was admirable—and smart.   > read more
By  Rem Rieder
Who’s in Charge?
The Miller affair, like previous Times fiascoes, raises questions about the paper's editing and decision-making.   > read more
By  Rem Rieder
Candor Time
The New York Times must tell us the inside story of the Judith Miller case.   > read more
By  Rem Rieder
Essential Again
As the tragedy of Katrina unfolded, the battered mainstream media elevated their games, challenging inaccurate statements by public officials and providing crucial information to an audience that needed it desperately.   > read more
By  Marc Fisher
Apocalypse in New Orleans
A firsthand account of how a small band of Times-Picayune journalists covered devastation and misery in their shattered home   > read more
By  Brian Thevenot
Uncharted Terrain
While it’s too soon to gauge the extent of the damage, the Judith Miller/Matthew Cooper case already has clouded source-reporter relationships and impelled news organizations and journalists to reexamine practices ranging from negotiating with sources to taking and storing notes.   > read more
By  Rachel Smolkin
Gun-Toting Journalists
It’s long been taboo for reporters to carry weapons. But what do you do when you’re in constant danger, your colleagues are being gunned down and the authorities can’t protect you?   > read more
By  Sherry Ricchiardi
The Chronicle Chronicles
Hearst had dreams of creating a world-class newspaper when it bought the San Francisco Chronicle nearly five years ago. Since then the paper has recruited big-time editing firepower, set the pace on coverage of the baseball steroid scandal and snared a Pulitzer. Now it faces serious financial problems as it struggles to forge a consistent identity.
What lies ahead?   > read more
By  Lori Robertson
A Fond Farewell
How Peter Jennings’ Middle East Expertise Helped a Newspaper Reporter   > read more
By  Patrick J. Sloyan

  > read more
By  AJR Staff
The Curse of Prescience
Covering a disaster in a city that belongs to all of us   > read more
By  Thomas Kunkel
Playing Big
The media's impressive coverage of hurricane Katrina   > read more
By  Rem Rieder
Web Special:
Black Tuesday

The axman cometh to Philadelphia’s newspapers.   > read more
By  Rem Rieder
Online Search and Rescue
Efforts to reunite Katrina’s victims were well-intentioned but chaotic.   > read more
By  Barb Palser
Bearing Witness
TV journalists delivered hard-hitting, heartrending accounts of Hurricane Katrina’s devastation.   > read more
By  Deborah Potter
A Magazine Is Not a Newspaper
An Alabama case shows why crafting a shield law isn’t easy.   > read more
By  Jane Kirtley
Dizzy in Detroit
The three-way deal shows how much the industry has changed.   > read more
By  John Morton
Eye on CBS
The network launches a blog to scrutinize its news operation.   > read more
By  Jennifer Dorroh
Everyone’s a Grammarian   > read more
By  Robin T. Reid
Leaving Iraq Behind
Knight Ridder’s Hannah Allam swaps Baghdad for Cairo.   > read more
By  Sarah Clark
An Inspirational and Instructive Memoir
Andrea Mitchell, a real-life Brenda Starr, looks back at an action-packed career in broadcast journalism.

Talking Back…to Presidents, Dictators, and Assorted Scoundrels
By Andrea Mitchell
432 pages; $25.95   > read more
Book review by  Carl Sessions Stepp

Too Harsh Indeed   > read more
A Tepid Response   > read more
Unmasking the Source   > read more
Back-Page Jumps   > read more
Costas Says No, Media Say Yes   > read more
Webb Reaction   > read more
What’s in a Name?
Does “refugee” depict the desperate plight of Katrina’s victims, or does it insult U.S. citizens?   > read more
By  Dana Hull
No Longer a Beacon of Hope
An African journalist laments the message Judith Miller’s jailing sends to the rest of the world.   > read more
By  Alagi Yorro Jallow