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February/March 2006

Two Cheers for McClatchy

The company’s victory is the best-case scenario for Knight Ridder, but some of its best papers have little reason to celebrate. Posted March 13, 2006   > read more
By  Rem Rieder

The Accidental Hunter

Why the Cheney saga deserves coverage, big time Posted February 15, 2006   > read more
By  Rem Rieder
To Publish or Not to Publish
American news organizations and the inflammatory Danish cartoons. Posted February 9, 2006   > read more
By  Rem Rieder
Sherman’s March
How Naples, Florida, money manager Bruce S. Sherman muscled Knight Ridder—the nation’s second-largest newspaper company—into putting itself up for sale   > read more
By  Charles Layton
Under Siege
Last year was a tough one for the newspaper industry. Papers slashed staffs, shuttered bureaus and cut back on newsholes. What does the future hold?   > read more
By  Paul Farhi
A number of journalists have testified about their conversations with confidential sources after receiving waivers from the sources freeing them to do so. Is this a pragmatic way to stay out of jail or a breach of journalistic ethics that could pose big problems for the profession?   > read more
By  Rachel Smolkin
Blogging on the Hustings
Bloggers were a significant and cacophonous force in Virginia’s gubernatorial election. What was their impact, and was that journalism they were practicing?   > read more
By  Marc Fisher
International Intrigue
After establishing the Times as a national newspaper, the New York Times Co. decided it was time to go worldwide. It took full control of the Paris-based International Herald Tribune by strong-arming its partner, the Washington Post Co., into selling its half-interest. Now the Times Co. is in the midst of a three-way global shootout with Dow Jones and the Financial Times.   > read more
By  Susan Paterno
Dilemma of Interest
Many law enforcement officials now use the vague term “person of interest” to describe people caught up in their investigations. That poses a challenge for journalists, who must try to convey a situation accurately without unfairly tarring someone’s reputation.   > read more
By  Donna Shaw
TV News Online   > read more
By  Carl Sessions Stepp
Toward a Paperless Society
And why that will bring happiness to the corporate suites   > read more
By  Thomas Kunkel
Falling to “Pieces”
A best-selling memoir unravels.   > read more
By  Rem Rieder
iPod, You Pod, We All Pod
Eager to lure news consumers, media outlets are experimenting with news-on-demand podcasts. They’re fun, fresh—and often unpolished.   > read more
By  Deborah Potter
Hype or the Real Deal?
Everyone’s jumping on the podcasting bandwagon, but is anybody listening?   > read more
By  Barb Palser
Web of Lies
A vicious Wikipedia entry underscores the difficulty of holding anyone responsible for misinformation on the Internet.   > read more
By  Jane Kirtley
Keeping the Faith
Newspapers are taking a beating, but don’t sound the death knell yet. The work they do will remain unique—and important.   > read more
By  John Morton
Penetrating the Fog
In “Weasel Words: The Dictionary of American Doublespeak,” University of Maryland professors Paul Wasserman and Don Hausrath shine the spotlight on language that obscures rather than illuminates. Some examples:   > read more
By  AJR Staff
Diversity U.
The Freedom Forum Diversity Institute trains talented minorities to be journalists.   > read more
By  Erin H. Bryant
The Bad Boy of Baltimore   > read more
By  Robin T. Reid
Weird, Wet and Wild
When a key source calls, reporters answer—no matter what.   > read more
By  Rachael Jackson
The Blog Revolution
Blog! How the Newest Media Revolution Is Changing Politics, Business, and Culture
By David Kline and Dan Burstein
CDS Books
402 pages; $24.95
  > read more
Book review by  Carl Sessions Stepp
Small Wonders   > read more
Helping Out   > read more
Isn’t It Ironic?   > read more
Going Native   > read more
An Alternative Model   > read more