Timesline  | American Journalism Review
From AJR,   December 1997

Timesline   

By Unknown
     



1881
The Los Angeles Times is founded by Nathan Cole Jr. and Thomas Gardiner. The next year their interests are sold to Harrison Gray Otis, who becomes the Times' first publisher.

1884
Times Mirror is incorporated.

1960
Otis Chandler becomes publisher, and the Times'
ascent to the top tier of American
newspapers begins.

1980
Chandler steps down.

1987
The Los Angeles Herald Examiner folds.

1989
Shelby Coffey III becomes editor of the Times.

Early 1990s
Recession hits Southern California; the Times' advertising revenue and profits plummet.

1993
The Times wins a Pulitzer for coverage
of L.A. riots the year before.

1994
Richard T. Schlosberg III becomes the Times' publisher.

APRIL 1995
The Times wins a Pulitzer for coverage of the 1994 Northridge earthquake.

JUNE 1995
General Mills executive Mark H. Willes, a newspaper neophyte, takes over as chairman, president and CEO of Times Mirror. Major cuts are implemented at the Times and elsewhere in the company. Times Mirror's stock price begins a dramatic upswing.

1996
Managing Editor George Cotliar retires and is succeeded by longtime foreign correspondent Michael Parks.

September 1997
Times Mirror announces Willes will become the Times' publisher after
Schlosberg retires at age 53.

October 1997
Coffey resigns and is succeeded by Managing Editor Parks. Willes launches a bold restructuring of the business side, stressing a much closer relationship with editorial.

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